Frequently Asked Questions

These are a few frequently asked questions in no particular order.

Questions regarding Tuition & Scholarships

What if our family can’t afford the entire cost of tuition? Are there scholarships available?

While we can offer no guarantees or promises of financial assistance, First Baptist Academy will work with you in every way to attempt to find the funds necessary to provide a Classical and Christian education for your child. If you have financial questions, please set up a time to talk with the Pastor. Certain scholarships and discounts may be available.

What kind of tuition assistance is available from First Baptist Church?

First Baptist Tuition Assistance program is need-based. From the earliest days of the conception of the school, there has been a desire for the school to reflect the larger Christian community. Tuition Assistance is as much a service to the school as it is to the families and fellow Christians who benefit directly from it.

 

A need-based Tuition Assistance program is available, but funds are extremely limited. It is awarded based upon a review of the financial situation of the family. In order to apply consult directly with the Pastor of the school.

Who should apply for Tuition Assistance?

Anyone who is concerned that they may not be able to truly afford this education for their children should apply. Applying does not guarantee qualifying. Only those who truly need Tuition Assistance qualify, but anyone who suspects that they may be in need of Tuition Assistance is encouraged to apply. Our financial counselors will review your application and will do everything possible to help you find the resources necessary to enroll your child at First Baptist.

Questions regarding Christian Belief and Doctrine

Do we need to attend any particular church to be accepted into First Baptist Church?

First Baptist Classical Academy is a ministry of First Baptist Church, a member church of the Fellowship of Evangelical Baptists. Although our charter is to provide classical education for students from sister churches of the Fellowship of Evangelical Baptists, we also embrace and accept students from any Christian church that holds to the essentials of the Christian faith. In fact, it is not actually necessary that your family or student be a Christian in order to be accepted at First Baptist Classical Academy, so long as you accept that our school is a Christian school and teaches in accordance with the Scriptures as outlined in our Statement of Faith. 

 

It should be clearly understood, however, that enrollment priority is first given to students from Fellowship of Evangelical Baptist Churches.

Questions regarding Teaching Method and Instruction

What version of the Bible do you teach from?

In our lower elementary grades we use the Christian Standard Bible for its easier readability. In our older grades we use the English Standard Version and the New American Standard Bible. Of course, students are allowed to bring any literal translation of the Bible to school for private reading and/or to fulfill the Scripture reading schedule we have the students follow.

How do you deal with new upper elementary or older students who haven’t had any Greek or Latin?

Currently First Baptist Classical Academy is only accepting students in Kindergarten through Grade 5 in order to avoid as much as possible any conflicts with the Greek and Latin learning requirement. As First Baptist Classical Academy begins accepting Grade 6 or higher level students, our policy will be that each student’s abilities be considered on an individual basis.

 

We will allow the student to ‘audit’ the Greek class. That is, the work is attempted by the student, but there are no grades issued. This leads to the student ultimately moving into a graded position.

Why do the students need to wear a Uniform?

Our development of a Uniform Dress Code is driven by a desire to create and promote an environment of learning where dress is not an undue distraction to the educational process. The motivation for the policy has grown out of the following principles:

 

  1. Our goal is to honor God in all we do, acknowledging the Lordship of Jesus Christ in all our choices, including our choice of dress.

  2. All human actions, including outward manifestations such as clothing, reveal and communicate the disposition of the heart at some level. It is our desire to address these heart issues in one very stringent Uniform Dress Code policy rather than seeking to anticipate and curb the numerous manifestations of it that surface throughout the year with a looser dress code.

  3. Clothing represents the vocational calling of a person, and inherent in the Uniform Dress Code is a desire to create an environment where undue attention is not drawn to specific students. The neat appearance created by a standard form of dress enhances a ready-to-learn atmosphere.

  4. Standard forms of dress help engender a cohesive presentation of the students in our school. When our students are dressed accordingly it communicates, aesthetically, that they are part of the same team, working toward the same goals. The student is part of a group identity that strives for excellence, and the code establishes a tradition toward that end.

  5. The Uniform Dress Code should save parents money. The dress code de-emphasizes the social impact of dress and helps focus the students on character and academic issues.

  6. The Uniform Dress Code also addresses security. On field trips, students in uniform aid the teachers in keeping track of everyone. On the playground or in the school, teachers and staff can clearly identify students from outsiders.

Questions regarding Latin and Greek?

How do you deal with new upper elementary or older students who haven’t had any Greek or Latin?

Currently First Baptist Classical Academy is only accepting students in Kindergarten through Grade 5 in order to avoid as much as possible any conflicts with the Greek and Latin learning requirement. As First Baptist Classical Academy begins accepting Grade 6 or higher level students, our policy will be that each student’s abilities be considered on an individual basis.

 

We will allow the student to ‘audit’ the Greek class. That is, the work is attempted by the student, but there are no grades issued. This leads to the student ultimately moving into a graded position.

Why teach Greek or Latin?

It is not an accident that Christianity is a religion that has, and perpetuates, a high view of words. The Lord Jesus Christ is Himself described as the Word (ho logos). We must, therefore, understand that our theology of words must be dependent upon our theology of the Word.

 

Nearly 80% of our English language derives from both Latin and Koine Greek. A study of these languages is a round-about way of better understanding English, but most importantly, a study of these languages will open the student up to the world of the classical works of antiquity and allow them to enter into a deeper understanding of the New Testament which was written in Greek.

 

So we study Latin and Greek for an appreciation of words in general, a greater understanding of our own English language, and for a deeper walk with the Living Word, Christ Himself.

How can parents be involved in the school?

How can parents be involved in the school?

We take parental authority and therefore parental involvement very seriously. Depending on your background, you might be surprised how ‘open’ First Baptist Academy is to have you come and be part of the school’s daily routine. From helping with reading groups or helping grade elementary papers, to recess supervision, to chaperoning field trips, to even assisting in teaching an elective class at the older levels, there are numerous practical ways to be in your child’s school.

Questions regarding Etiquette & Protocol

What is Protocol?

At First Baptist Classical Academy, we believe that love is in the details. We believe that there is, and ought to be, a proper way for Christian young men and young ladies to conduct themselves which is most pleasing to God and most loving and considerate of others. Our aim is to conduct ourselves with careful consideration for others and an attention to detail that reflects that care and concern for others.

 

You will see this in the way boys are required to hold the doors for the girls and the way students stand to address their teacher, among other etiquette standards we teach and enforce.

 

In a sense, all this training culminates in what we will eventually call our “Protocol” events at the Rhetoric level. In the future when the kids mature to this level of education, we will set aside two evenings, one each for the lower secondary school classes (Grade 9/10) and for the upper secondary school (Grade 11/12) during which the students dress up in semi- or formal, attractive and modest attire, and go out to a special meal and event. They receive detailed meal and behavior etiquette training over a few days prior to the event. Young men escort the ladies, but it’s not a ‘dating’ situation; rather, it is a delightful time of showing mutual consideration and respect in a loving, considerate, Christian atmosphere.

Why do the students need to wear a Uniform?

Our development of a Uniform Dress Code is driven by a desire to create and promote an environment of learning where dress is not an undue distraction to the educational process. The motivation for the policy has grown out of the following principles:

 

  1. Our goal is to honor God in all we do, acknowledging the Lordship of Jesus Christ in all our choices, including our choice of dress.

  2. All human actions, including outward manifestations such as clothing, reveal and communicate the disposition of the heart at some level. It is our desire to address these heart issues in one very stringent Uniform Dress Code policy rather than seeking to anticipate and curb the numerous manifestations of it that surface throughout the year with a looser dress code.

  3. Clothing represents the vocational calling of a person, and inherent in the Uniform Dress Code is a desire to create an environment where undue attention is not drawn to specific students. The neat appearance created by a standard form of dress enhances a ready-to-learn atmosphere.

  4. Standard forms of dress help engender a cohesive presentation of the students in our school. When our students are dressed accordingly it communicates, aesthetically, that they are part of the same team, working toward the same goals. The student is part of a group identity that strives for excellence, and the code establishes a tradition toward that end.

  5. The Uniform Dress Code should save parents money. The dress code de-emphasizes the social impact of dress and helps focus the students on character and academic issues.

  6. The Uniform Dress Code also addresses security. On field trips, students in uniform aid the teachers in keeping track of everyone. On the playground or in the school, teachers and staff can clearly identify students from outsiders.

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